Journey(Footsteps) of Taiwanese Americans (1 of 2)

DepartFrom Taiwan

▲ by Susan Hsiu-fang Liu, oil on canvas, 48”(w) x 36”/

Departing from Taiwan

This painting depicts college graduates departing from Taiwan to America for graduate study in the 60’s or 70’s. Some students got married right before their departure, which is shown right by the chapel.

The front gate of National Taiwan University and the chapel of Tunghai University to represent universities in Taiwan.

Students in their graduation gowns and a young man in the military uniform are included to show the students before they were ready to go to America. The students were required to have interviews at the US embassy prior to the departure. These students would travel either by propeller airplanes from the 松山airport, or by cargo ships. Besides carrying a lot of luggage, they would also bring 大同電鍋 with them.

The Statue of Liberty is used to represent the destination: America.  

Arrived in America

▲ by Susan Hsiu-fang Liu, oil on canvas, 48”(w) x 36”/

Arrived in America

1. In this painting, the Golden Gate Bridge (West); the St. Louis Arch (Midwest); and New York City (East) are used to represent the vast geography of the great country of America. University campuses are used to represent the common destinations of most Taiwanese students coming to America for graduate study.
2. On the left, two male students are picking up a new female student at the airport with an old, big car. Back in the day, the majority of students were male, so they would work extra hard to be the first one to greet a female student when she arrived at the airport. Taiwanese women would always dress up for special occasions, even when taking a long trip.
3. To save money, some students took the Greyhound bus to their destinations. These trips could last for 2-3 days. A story is also included about a student who did not arrange for someone to pick him up. Therefore, he was sitting outside of the bus station waiting for a miracle.
4. Hot dogs with ketchup and mustard and Coca-cola are used to represent some of the new food that we encountered upon coming to America.
5. The complicated freeway system is used to represent one of the first impressions when arrived in America. This complex freeway system also represents the unknown future each newcomer would face.
6. The green lawn is also used to represent the American landscape, which we did not have in Taiwan.

The East Coast Summer Conference of Taiwanese Americans

▲by Chao-Min Liu, oil on canvas, 48”(w) x 36”

The East Coast Summer Conference of Taiwanese Americans

The summer Taiwanese-American Conference / East Coast (TAC/EC) has been meeting since 1969. It is the largest and oldest conference by Taiwanese-Americans in the United States.  The meeting takes place annually during the July 4th Independence Day long weekend for 2 to 4 days at different locations on the east coast.

TAC-EC hightlights

▲by Jason Chang, pastel on paper, 38”(w) x 27.5”

The subjects of the conference cover a wide range of interests for both first and second generations Taiwanese-Americans.  The conference shows a strong support for reforming our motherland’s political system to be more democratic.  It is also a gathering for social networking and relaxation. The live cultural performances on “Taiwan Night” are some of the highlights of this gathering.

Softball Game in the Park

▲by Chao-Min Liu, oil on canvas, 48”(w) x 36”

Softball Game in the Park

The first generation of Taiwanese Americans quickly fell in love with the game of softball. Students from Taiwan often gathered together during the summer weekends to play softball. It was also a good family outing for young couples and their children. They also organized travel teams to different locations to participate in the Taiwanese Americans regional softball tournament every year. As time progressed, softball teams have grown to consist of parents and their teenage children.  Second generation Taiwanese Americans have also continued the softball tradition in our local communities.

This painting depicts both young male and female players. It also reflects the retired player who serves as the home base referee.

Summer Picnic

▲by Chao-Min Liu, oil on canvas, 48”(w) x 36”

Summer Picnic

Picnics and barbeques in near-by parks were a popular past time for Taiwanese Americans in the summer.  Softball, Tug of war, and other group games were played by kids and adults. Strong friendship was formed at this type of social gathering.

Demonstration

▲by Chao-Min Liu, oil on canvas, 48”(w) x 36”

Demonstration

Taiwanese Americans have demonstrated in front of the White House, Times Square, state capitals, and the United Nations Headquarters to show their strong support for an independent and democratic Taiwan. The painting depicts a demonstration that took place in Time Square demanding for the admission of Taiwan as a member of the United Nations.

 

 

Be the first to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.


*


*